Sunday, August 27, 2006

a giant leap for a United States of Africa.

Uni-visa key to a United States of Africa, (The Herald, 2005-08-05):-
Before the 1885 Berlin Conference that partitioned Africa into exploitable colonies, Africans were "lexgens sans frontiers" - people without borders.

They did not know any borders until after the Berlin Conference that carved the continent according to Europe's whims under the guise of establishing formal states. After Africa attained political independence, the crusade for a United States of Africa began in earnest.

Kwame Nkrumah, the founding father of the Organisation of African Unity (now African Union), mooted the idea, Libyan President Muammar Gaddafi pursued it vigorously and the AU meeting in Sirte, Libya, last month embraced the first giant step towards real continental unity. AU leaders resolved to introduce a uni-visa system that would facilitate the free movement of people across the continent.

This move would not only boost trade, but would also enhance communication and strengthen continental integration. The system has been in place in other regions such as the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas) and the European Union (EU) where it reaped economic, social and political benefits for member states.

The EU has fostered unity since 1952, to the extent of introducing a single currency, the euro, which is speeding up economic development. Ecowas, on the other hand, has already opened borders in West Africa. Southern African Development Community (Sadc) countries agreed to speedily implement the uni-visa system. In fact, South Africa and Mozambique have already worked out modalities to enable their citizens to cross borders without visas, and Zimbabwe and Mozambique have also signed an agreement to this effect.

Africa can consolidate its power through integration of ideas, creation of one military force and one currency that would go a long way in asserting the sovereignty of the continent. The borders that African states have were carved by colonial powers to avoid conflicts at the feeding trough; but effectively delayed Africa's independence through divide and rule.

Though the Berlin Conference managed to avert settler conflicts, the colonial legacy that divided nationalities between countries like Chad and Sudan, Nigeria and Cameroon, Namibia and Angola, and Malawi and Zambia has at times brewed potentially disastrous conflicts, some of which degenerated into civil wars that retarded development.

The uni-visa system will be implemented at pilot or regional level before it spreads throughout the continent, and observers say that regional member states should be wary of the price of integration, which might see countries with strong economies like South Africa ending up with net immigration. Fear of this development forced Britain to remain outside the euro zone However, Sadc has already made huge strides towards free movement as cross-border truck drivers have been using uni-visas for sometime now.

Like what has been done with the Sadc driver's licence, there are plans to introduce a regional identity card that would allow easy monitoring of cross-border movement. All these moves will have positive spin-offs for tourism, which is incidentally the world's largest and fastest growing industry.

Sadc's immense tourism potential can only be fully tapped through greater integration. In 2003 alone, Sadc received 13,5 million tourists. However, the numbers would be much bigger if factors influencing tourist arrivals and expenditure are made more conducive. The scraping of visa requirements will also promote international tourism and, in turn, boost tourism revenue.

The common visa system is predicated on the principle that the easier a country is to visit, the greater the number of tourists. While the introduction of the uni-visa system is welcome, efforts should be made to mitigate the evils of cross-border crime as well as xenophobia, since nationals of one country may feel threatened by immigrants from other countries. If the uni-visa system is not properly implemented, it can worsen cross-border crimes like human and drug trafficking, car thefts and smuggling by criminals taking advantage of free passage.

There is need for the creation of a regional police force along the lines of Interpol. Cross-border crime has been a problem for Ecowas and the EU. Sadc countries must work towards the harmonisation of law enforcement to prevent the scourge.

There is also need to agree on certain principles before implementation. Immigration laws should be harmonised and entry points computerised. Most of the region's border posts use archaic manual methods, which need to be modernised for efficiency.

A centralised immigration database and training schemes for immigration and customs officials are also essential. Examination of immigration legislation and regulations of each member state will also need to be undertaken to come up with a timetable for the harmonisation of regulations and application forms for single and multi-destination travel within Sadc.

There is also need to agree on the format of a regional uni-visa sticker or stamp that will replace stamps of member states. On account of Africa's socio-cultural and economic dynamics, the uni-visa will be an excellent instrument in the promotion of economic development, understanding and goodwill and foster close relations between African people.

It is disheartening that in spite of the great promise that Africa has for economic unity, most of the potential remains un-or-underdeveloped, and thus does not contribute to the continent's economic growth. Since Africa in general and Sadc in particular will host the 2010 Fifa World Cup, the uni-visa would facilitate the free movement of tourist and football fans. Unhindered movement of people also paves way for the introduction of a single currency that would, in turn, stabilise the region's economies.

Africa's full potential can only be achieved through the collective and concerted action of all states by evolving clearly defined policies and strategies for development. Since the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step, the uni-visa is the first tentative stride that should translate into a giant leap for a United States of Africa.

Mafabi on United States of Africa

Mafabi on United States of Africa

David Mafabi of The Daily Monitor, Kampala, Uganda, wrote the following editorial in response to the African Union's proposal to form a 'United States of Africa.'

Will we ever witness a real United States of Africa? Or rather will our future generations ever do so? Learning about the United Nation's millennium goals got me thinking, why can't Africa write her own goals? It does not take a mathematician to figure out that Africa is the wealthiest continent on the planet. In every corner of this great continent there is an abundance of natural resources; minerals, oil, gas, gold, diamonds; which the developed world needs.

Any economist in any western country will gladly inform you that where demand exceeds supply prices are automatically higher. Not in Africa. Let me rephrase that: Western goods sold in Africa are naturally priced higher, but African goods sold here seem to go against the demand & supply rule.

At this juncture I am in the least bit interested in trade quotas or embargos simply because they were made effective a long time ago and were very well suited to the needs of colonial rulers. When our traders (not farmers) cry foul that United States and European farmers get subsidies - thus rendering our produce unsellable within their markets - I cannot help but think 'why send them our produce in the first place?' Isn't Africa starving to the point of extinction? Why should we spend sleepless nights at the thought of the United States not extending AGOA (African Growth and Opportunity Act) when we can make use of the clothes, let alone the export revenue we could earn from other African States?

Wouldn't it be nice for Starbucks Coffee Company to beg countries up and down this continent to sell them coffee beans? Imagine the great British chocolate company Cadbury's pleading to buy cocoa pods from Ghana based on prices that Ghana sets, not the price that was set five or six generations back.

No doubt politicians may read this and pass it off (claiming) that I am talking rubbish since I do not know how prices are set in the first place. That may be true, but I know one thing; and that is that Africans cannot be forced into selling anything that they do not want to - or be forced to sell their products at a set price. What they can do is to find buyers of their products without a set price or better still use their own products. I advocate for the latter: The U.N.'s millennium goal number Eight.

Ours would just be one: Self Sufficiency. This, in my opinion, would be best achieved once we have a united Africa. Africa has the potential to become a food basket for itself and beyond. As the world gets more disenchanted with the use of chemicals in drugs and food we could supply them with organic produce. It could also become the world's biggest jewelry shop, selling and storing gold, diamonds and other gemstones.

Why send diamonds to Brussels and India when people from those countries can come here and buy them with a sticker on them saying 'Made in Africa,' thus increasing tourism? The list is endless. But I hear many of you saying this is not new news. The only message that is new is my message of becoming self-sufficient first, before thinking about exporting.

Businessmen and politicians may say that exports bring in more revenue, but I say 'no wonder the rich get richer.' If forefathers in developed countries did not sacrifice to build their nations patriotically then future generations would not be enjoying the wealth they have today. If we treated this continent like one big country, imagine what quality of life we would have. Imagine Uganda producing only vegetables, Kenya producing only wheat, Tanzania producing only maize, etc. A place for (all) gold, another for diamonds etc. A full-fledged railway line cutting across the continent, sorting out problems of the landlocked countries. We would soon become a China or India - a place where they export more than they import - places which dictate to the rest of the world the price and quantity they send to it. Imagine the development we would enjoy.

But will this ever be achieved? I do not know about you, but my hopes are dim. If within Uganda we can oppose our own Seeya's development plans then how do we expect to co-operate with our neighboring countries? Will we be able to relinquish some of our monopolies to the neighbors? Would we be able to abandon wearing designer clothes and choose to wear our own designed outfits? The East African Community is yet to become a reality. Will the United States of Africa ever see the light of day?

Commitment to vote "YES for the United States of Africa"

Commitment to vote "YES for the United States of Africa"
In order that the African people may be relieved from today's multifarious and overwhelming poverty so as to live in peace and prosperity, I pledge to participate in the process of uniting Africa politically and economically, before the year 2005, by transforming the OAU into a Confederation comprising among other institutions, an Assembly of Heads of State and Government, already in place, a Pan-African Parliament, a Pan-African Court of Justice, a Continental Government, a single Continental Market with a Common Currency(AFRI), a Common Defense System, to be instituted immediately, an African Civil Society Organization, etc. Consequently, I shall vote and help vote "YES for the United States of Africa" at the Pan-African Referendum to be organized on this issue.

The United States of Africa debate should focus on four fundamental transformations:

First, African states need to adopt a policy of "first call" for Africa. Africa should put its interests first in terms of using its resources, both human and material. It is shameful for a continent that is as rich as Africa to go begging for debt relief when in essence all its resources are underutilised. Africa must make its case in the international marketplace by adopting more aggressive policies.

Second, Africa needs to conduct its foreign policies and diplomacy differently, concentrating its energies on Africa and African relationships.

Refusing to allow unsavoury regimes and wars to thrive on the continent is the third transformation. Concerted conflict management needs to be the first item on the agenda of individual states, the OAU, and regional organisations like Igad, SADC, Ecowas and EAC.

Lastly, the struggle to promote the dignity of black people and institutions both in Africa and outside it, should not be manipulated to condone black imperialism in Africa. The interventionist role played by Uganda and Rwanda in Congo is an example of just the kind of expansionism Africa does not need.

Opiyo Ododa is a post-graduate student at the Institute of Diplomacy and International Studies at the University of Nairobi

The African Civil Rights Movement



Resolution of The African Civil Rights Movement
Seconded by the Schiller Institute Conference


The African Civil Rights Movement put forward the following resolution Sept. 5, 1999, at the Labor Day conference of the Schiller Institute/ICLC in Northern Virginia. Speaking for the Movement, Godfrey Binaisa, former President of Uganda, proposed the resolution, which upon the motion of Helga Zepp LaRouche was passed by acclamation.

WHEREAS, African nation-states until now miss true sovereignty to which they are entitled by right, and which is now being denied Africa by the might of its former European colonizers with their ally, the United States;

WHEREAS, Africa ended the last century under colonial servitude and oppression; Africa is about to end this century in wars, pestilence, famine, and disease;

WHEREAS, this century has seen us attaining independence on paper. It has not seen us attaining true sovereignty;

WHEREAS, it is only our former European colonizers together with their ally, the United States, which itself was a colony of Britain, who are sovereign in the fullest meaning of that term. The United States policies on Africa, are still on the coattails of British policy.

Africa is still agonizing under the colonialism of the IMF and World Bank, both put in place at the end of World War II by European powers and the United States, and they control the economies of Africa with an iron hand clad in a velvet glove, to serve only the interests of the supposedly departed imperalists;

WHEREAS, even the paper independence we attained was paid for at a very high price of pain and suffering, incarceration and deaths of millions of African freedom fighters. The IMF and World Bank, through their founders, continue as our new colonial governors, to control all aspects of our economies and development, rendering our paper independence null and void and of no use whatsoever;

WHEREAS, all people of good will throughout the world agree with those sacred words in the American Declaration of Independence that all men are born equal and have unalienable rights, among them the rights

African Civil Rights Movement



Resolution ofThe African Civil Rights Movement
Seconded by the Schiller Institute Conference


The African Civil Rights Movement put forward the following resolution Sept. 5, 1999, at the Labor Day conference of the Schiller Institute/ICLC in Northern Virginia. Speaking for the Movement, Godfrey Binaisa, former President of Uganda, proposed the resolution, which upon the motion of Helga Zepp LaRouche was passed by acclamation.

WHEREAS, African nation-states until now miss true sovereignty to which they are entitled by right, and which is now being denied Africa by the might of its former European colonizers with their ally, the United States;

WHEREAS, Africa ended the last century under colonial servitude and oppression; Africa is about to end this century in wars, pestilence, famine, and disease;

WHEREAS, this century has seen us attaining independence on paper. It has not seen us attaining true sovereignty;

WHEREAS, it is only our former European colonizers together with their ally, the United States, which itself was a colony of Britain, who are sovereign in the fullest meaning of that term. The United States policies on Africa, are still on the coattails of British policy.

Africa is still agonizing under the colonialism of the IMF and World Bank, both put in place at the end of World War II by European powers and the United States, and they control the economies of Africa with an iron hand clad in a velvet glove, to serve only the interests of the supposedly departed imperalists;

WHEREAS, even the paper independence we attained was paid for at a very high price of pain and suffering, incarceration and deaths of millions of African freedom fighters. The IMF and World Bank, through their founders, continue as our new colonial governors, to control all aspects of our economies and development, rendering our paper independence null and void and of no use whatsoever;

WHEREAS, all people of good will throughout the world agree with those sacred words in the American Declaration of Independence that all men are born equal and have unalienable rights, among them the rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. In practice at the present day, Africa is excluded; hence it is today treated as a colonial continent for the West to plunder, loot, and decimate;

WHEREAS, none of the supposedly departed colonial powers ever advised us to get rid of them. It would be unwise to hope that a day will come in the dim future whereon the same powers will advise us how to agitate and struggle for the attainment of full sovereignty, because the European powers and the United States do not yet believe that Africans are born equal with Europeans and Americans;

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, AND IT IS HEREBY RESOLVED, by the African Civil Rights Movement and friends to condemn in the strongest possible language the continued roles of the IMF and World Bank as at present constituted, and to undertake to spearhead any move for the early demise of these two world institutions, which to Africa mean no more than the extension of colonialism into the third millennium.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the policies of the IMF and World Bank are the two main culprits in denying us our sovereign rights as free and independent nations. Their sustainable adjustment programs have only adjusted our stomachs to hunger and our bodies to disease. We are far poorer today than before independence. And as some European Christian missionaries have written about us that we are poor because we are backward, and we are backward because we are poor, this is a trap we shall never get out of until we get the IMF and World Bank off our backs.

Henceforth, the whole of Africa has to join the agitation for sovereignty as we agitated for independence more than 30 years ago.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that we stand foursquare behind the policy of Mahathir Mohamad, Prime Minister of Malaysia, of Selective Exchange Controls to fight against speculators and unscrupulous currency raiders.

We note with satisfaction that Robert Mugabe, President of Zimbabwe, came out in the open to adopt policies similar to those of Malaysia. We rest confident that the whole of Africa will get together in a United States of Africa, and stop being exploited by the IMF, World Bank, or any other force that may be formed to keep Africa as a colony in perpetuity.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the African Civil Rights Movement in its fight for sovereignty shall not rest until Africa through renewed nationalism achieves:
(a) Sovereignty of every African mind;
(b) Sovereignty of every African state;
(c) Sovereignty of every African soul;
(d) Sovereignty of every African land and natural resource;
(e) Sovereignty that shall free everything we call our own from continuous looting and exploitation by the mighty and powerful well into the 21st century and beyond.

Signed, for the African Civil Rights Movement:
Godfrey BinaisaChairman

creation of a pan-African stock exchange


Also topical at the summit will be progress towards the creation of the United States of Africa.

A report is expected to be tabled by the Committee of Heads of State and Government on the Realisation of Political and Economic Integration which has been tasked with the responsibility to spearhead the establishment of the United States of Africa

The idea of a United States of Africa is the brainchild of Libyan president Muammar Gaddafi who has since 2000 pushed for the unification of Africa as a national and sovereign federation of states similar to the United States of America.

The creation of the federation of African states presupposes the establishment of the African Economic Community built around free trade areas (FTAs) in the continent’s four main regions.
One of these building blocks is the Southern African Development Community (SADC), which is targeting becoming an FTA by 2008. Significant progress has been made since 2000 in phasing out tariffs on intra-regional trade.
The SADC Protocol on Trade was signed in 1996 but a meticulous negotiation process delayed its implementation until 2000.
The target is to have 85 percent of all products traded in the SADC region at zero tariff by 2008.
The AU is also pursuing the free movement of persons across the continent and introduction of an African diplomatic passport, a development that would quicken the transition towards a United States of Africa.

The AU leaders will also consider during the Khartoum summit a proposal by Libya to shake off the legacy of the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) and introduce a new logo and flag for the AU.
The AU was launched in Durban, South Africa, in July 2002 to replace the OAU but the symbols of the organisation have not changed. Libya will push at the summit that these are changed to reflect the organisation’s new identity.
Other issues expected to be discussed at the summit include the impact of HIV and AIDS on the continent, creation of a pan-African stock exchange with a seat in Egypt or South Africa, establishment of a fund to alleviate the effects of increases in oil price on poor countries.

Africa compared to the rest of the world



Africa, the Dark Continent. A romantic name for an unknown and underexplored region of the world to the Europeans of the 19th century. Today is different though, we know Africa and have mapped out every last mystery - even that elusive source of the Nile.
Take a look at a night time map of Africa compared to the rest of the world - yes it’s very dark.

Even Google is concerned, the number of searches from Africa compared (again) to the rest of the world is miniscule. (I apologize for not being able to get a larger and more up-to-date image, this is from 2003)

Let’s take a look at a news attention map, highlighting where the big news organizations are focusing (countries in deep red are experiencing the most attention).

Looking at the above maps, one can see that Africa is still dark infrastructurally, technologically and on top of that, the world just doesn’t care. What does that mean for Africa and Africans?
I sit in a strange place, as do many of you who read this blog. We are considered the African first-movers on web technology, the African Digerati if you will. Our insights into technology are not the same as the vast majority of those who live in Africa and our knowledge and perspective of Africa is much different than the rest of the world’s. We, currently, are the people on the bridge - maybe even the bridge - that spans the divide of both knowledge and technology when it comes to Africa.
So, in our unique position, what do we see? This is what I see:
I see young Africans gaining access to technology and connecting to the world at a greater pace than ever before. What happens when you get millions of children on $100 computers? How does that change their world view and affect the way communication happens?
I s

The Dark Continent: It’s Still Dark



Africa, the Dark Continent. A romantic name for an unknown and underexplored region of the world to the Europeans of the 19th century. Today is different though, we know Africa and have mapped out every last mystery - even that elusive source of the Nile.
Take a look at a night time map of Africa compared to the rest of the world - yes it’s very dark.

Even Google is concerned, the number of searches from Africa compared (again) to the rest of the world is miniscule. (I apologize for not being able to get a larger and more up-to-date image, this is from 2003)

Let’s take a look at a news attention map, highlighting where the big news organizations are focusing (countries in deep red are experiencing the most attention).

Looking at the above maps, one can see that Africa is still dark infrastructurally, technologically and on top of that, the world just doesn’t care. What does that mean for Africa and Africans?
I sit in a strange place, as do many of you who read this blog. We are considered the African first-movers on web technology, the African Digerati if you will. Our insights into technology are not the same as the vast majority of those who live in Africa and our knowledge and perspective of Africa is much different than the rest of the world’s. We, currently, are the people on the bridge - maybe even the bridge - that spans the divide of both knowledge and technology when it comes to Africa.
So, in our unique position, what do we see? This is what I see:
I see young Africans gaining access to technology and connecting to the world at a greater pace than ever before. What happens when you get millions of children on $100 computers? How does that change their world view and affect the way communication happens?
I see an Africa on the verge of a technical revolution that leapfrogs years of government corruption and of condescension by the world’s developed nations. What happens when the government can’t control information or communication?
I see people who want to be recognized as more than just the hand-out junkies that their governments make them look like. Technology is giving them that voice, and will give them more over the coming years. This begs another question: what happens when the highly educated African diaspora return, or invest?
The truth is that the world is changing faster than anyone anticipated. It’s changing so fast that the governments of the West can’t even keep up. If the governments of the West are hopelessly behind the technology curve, where does that put African governments?
Yet change happens without governments. Some would say that great changes happen precisely because governments can’t keep up, they can’t even understand what is happening. Laws are passed, yet those laws mean nothing because the technology has already moved past them.
Those who create, develop and invest in new technologies are the ones who write the rules of tomorrow.
Programmers are working on the platforms and programs that everyone will be using a year or two from now - they are the front line workers. Who are the idea-men behind them? Who recognizes the potential for change and revolution in an industry? Does it matter their nationality?
Those with ideas rule the future (think Niklas Zennstrom, Bill Gates, Sergey Brin, Richard Barton, etc…). These people have changed industries, some have changed how governments act. All have changed the way we act and view the world.
Africa too will change, is changing. What are the ways new technology can be used to further affect change? Ideas have no nationality, yet implementation of those ideas takes an understanding of a particular region. Again, as the African Digerati we stand in a unique an advantageous position, some as idea-men and others as implementers.
Who among us are the African idea-men? Who will invest? Who will implement?

asks if there will soon be a “United States of AFrica”?



Chippla’s Weblog, asks if there will soon be a “United States of AFrica”?

“Do these names mean anything to you: Thabo Mbeki, Olusegun Obasanjo, John Kufuor, Abdoulaye Wade, Meles Zenawi, Ahmed Ouyahia and Alpha Omar Konare? According to this report, they are seven of the most powerful men in Africa and they met in a summit tagged “Africa and the challenges of the global order: Desirability of union government” in the Nigerian capital of Abuja to discuss ways of moving forward with the political unification of their continent.” Chippla concludes that it is doubtful Africa would emerge as one country, at least not in the next 50 years which is a pretty long time.
Sokari Ekine

According to John Kufor, who by the way is the Oxford-educated president of Ghana:
"The call for a united Africa has been around for a long time...Some want to go only as far as the European Union, while for others it has to be nothing short of one central government…The emerging reality is that the rest of the world is already constituted as political unions or economic blocs."Ghana of the 1950s was the birthplace of modern day pan-Africanism with leaders such as the late Kwame Nkrumah advocating the creation of a single African nation modeled on socialist ideals.While closer political and economic ties among various African countries is laudable, its litmus test lies not in policies formulated by a ruling elite but in the response of individual citizens. Like in most parts of the world, governments of rich African countries require visas from citizens of poorer countries. This has a lot to do with the fear of uncontrolled migration which might eventually put a strain on social services.Looking at it another way however, some of the poorest parts of Africa could also be the most rewarding from a business point of view. With places like Liberia and Sierra Leone coming out of years of civil war, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (or what I like to call the richest yet poorest piece of land on the planet) still trying to get its feet on the ground, business opportunities abound and the liberalization of financial and labor laws could go a long way in fostering desirable cross border migrations.Africa will likely not become a single country in the next half century but closer ties will now become the norm rather than the exception. In the 21st century, there is simply no way small nation states can survive on their own in the sea of globalization and multinational dominance – it's a good thing to see that nationalistic perceptions are being trashed away in favor of reality.The West African regional bloc (ECOWAS) allows for the freedom of movement of people. A nice gesture I would say but goods and services are still not allowed to move freely. Thus, it is not uncommon for Nigeria to ban, unban and ban Ghanaian goods. It seems there is still quite a long way to go, for if goods and services still cannot move freely in West Africa, I wonder how long it would take for this to happen in all of Africa. You see, sometimes it's protectionist government policies, under the cloak of protecting national interests, that hinder development.
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Posted by Chippla Vandu, 1:53 PM links to this post
14 Comments:
I remember hearing this idea back in the 70s, perhaps now with advances in telecommunication, health care and engineering it will finally come to pass. I think this would be the best thing for Africa.Civilizations seem to have a natural ebb and flow, from Asia to the Middle East, Europe and the Americas, all sprouted numerous unique cultures which have continued the natural progression of human civilization, each making its own special contributions to this continuing cycle. It's remarkable how few people are aware that some of the earliest known organized civilization arose in Africa, we just don't have a strong record of these civilizations mostly because of a lack of written language. While some may disregard these earliest civilizations as the poor stepchildren of written history, given the cycle we've seen through recorded time, it seems highly likely that what was created by our earliest of documented civilizations, sprang from foundations laid and knowledge gleaned directly from those early Africans, who remain shrouded in the mists of unrecorded time.Perhaps in this great circle of civilizations, Africa's time is quickly approaching again.Aaron
Posted by The Dead at 9:41 PM, November 13, 2005
Thanks for your comments. There can be little doubt that Africa served as the bedrock for all modern civilizations in the world. Though modern African civilizations were often viewed as primitive by the Europeans, they did show signs of development such as having structured and organized kingdoms. Africans, like most people in other parts of the ancient world domesticated crops and animals (probably not to the same degree as the people in Europe and Asia, though this is debatable). The Aborigines of Australia did not.The lack of advancement of African civilization lies in my opinion, on their refusal to open up to new ideas from outside. For instance, no country in sub-Saharan Africa (excluding Ethiopia) was able to develop an indigenous modern writing style. No single civilization or country has managed to achieve development by remaining isolated from others. This is the time for African countries to learn that unless they open up to themselves, they will have no future. I would not advocate pan-Africanism based on socialist ideas like Mr. Kwame Nkruma but I do think that a United States of Africa will be a wonderful thing for the African continent.
Posted by Chippla at 10:03 PM, November 13, 2005
This is a very interesting concept and much of what you both (Aaron, Chippla) have written here sounds great.Economic development and social stability should be high priorities on the political agendas of smart African leaders in this century. Inter-regional trade and commerce and other forms of cooperation are very important in helping to achieve these goals.However, I cannot at this time see the people of various African nations who have been bitter rivals and enemies of one another for eons endorsing and supporting such an idea.It would be a gargantuan task to get the diverse peoples of the African continent onboard. They would have to be convinced of the immediate and tangible benefits for their daily lives and also be ready to abandon centuries of mistrust and animosity toward their neighbors and outsiders.European's constant bickering over the policies and actions of the European Union and the European Parliament re: issues such as the controversy over admitting Turkey (and other countries) into the European Economic Community are good examples of how difficult it is to create a strong and enduring union of nations working for the benefit of all members.
Posted by Black River Eagle at 1:30 PM, November 14, 2005
I think a United States of Africa is unrealistic. Too many people have power that they don't want to relinquish. Even the more ethnically and culturally homogeneous (and much smaller) Europe only has a moderate degree of integration. And even that has not been without controversy.And you have admit that while many of the some leaders have called for such a union, the actions of many are contrary to that very spirit. Even Meles, who was part of this meeting you cite, is ratcheting up the rhetoric against Eritrea thus risking of a reprise of their insane border war. Insane border wars are surely antithetical to the spirit of such unions. The best option at the time, as you said, is increased integration of a regional level. Freedom of movement for citizens and goods. Economic and political cooperation. Such improvements need to occur gradually. After all, I'm sure that in 1945, no one would have thought that by 2005, France and Germany would be each other's closest ally.
Posted by Brian at 3:43 PM, November 14, 2005
Most importantly,there's need to create a formidable economic strength that can match that of China, the EU and other markets in the world. It is then that trade talks can be taken more seriously by developed nations and exportations can soar higher.This can only be done by uniting African nations.
Posted by Anthony Arojojoye at 10:06 AM, November 16, 2005
I well appreciate all comments that were posted by each one of you. I would likie to add this comment also.I think the social side of unity between african citizens plays a major part in harmonising all other aspects of african unity. If african leaders started to address this issue, it means that they will be able to address other progressive issues. The social side is the basic element of any unity. If people are united and harmonised, it will be an unperpinning for any type of continueing integration at higher level. I think this could be by regional bodies in Africa developing similar kinds of services (like health, education etc...)among each other, and with the freedom of movement of people, like in West Africa, people are going to realise that are all the same. I will give you now an example of my social argument. In Europe, there are so many deprived ethnic minorities and clesses. Why is that? It is because higher classed people and native citizens of those European countries are not prepared to accept them. Even with the developement of equal oppurtunities policies, you still see signs of a very huge divisions in society that most of people do not notice and regards as unimportant, according to ethnicity and social class.The social side is the basic for civil peace on an individual national and at all levels up to a continental level.
Posted by Ahmed at 8:57 AM, November 18, 2005
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Posted by Ahmed at 9:33 AM, November 18, 2005
Moreover, it will play part in calming down disagreements, if it was addressed. This is because it will have an affect on political policies. If services were harmonised, then it would be difficult to contradict with others at any higher level. The other side of social harmonising is that it gives a sense of equality among citizens from other African countries. They all get the same, so there will not be any fuel for any anomisties to arise amongst them. An example of that is in Eritrea, where ethnic manorities get equal share of any kinds of development, even in media, which kept that country in internal peace and a high degree of domestic stability inbetween citizens there. This is reflected on its crime rate (Eritrea is until now a country with one of the lowest crime rates in the whole world according to global statistics, if we ignored the warfare with Ethiopia which has nothing to do with local crime rate in Eritrea). Inequality and also dominance of power and wealth by one ethnic group was a major factor in most of past war situations that the continent witnessed in the last decades. This can also be addressed as a inter-national level, but it might take different forms and perceptions. It should be addressed as a more of human basic needs issue at a more peaceful time that Africa is witnessing now. This issue will help in facilitaing the way for the upcoming steps towards more unity at higher levels. All of the above regional social harmonising (and any other subsequent developements in relation to integration) must be addressed at an AU level and each region should be given guidelines on which they act on, and these guidelines should be geared and directed at the end into harmonising the social side at a continental level. For this to happen we need to wait for the Pan-African Parliament policies to be compulsory on all AU state memebers as planned, and this must be implemented for any African unitification steps to take a real and profound effect.One of the most important social elements that I must address is the environment. We all need to live in areas, where we do not feel ill and become infected with different diseases. That is a better option for our future generations to help them have a stable growth and future prospects.
Posted by Ahmed at 9:43 AM, November 18, 2005
Counsel from elders seems to be a lost treasure. Lost are lessons learned that may contain pearls of wisdom that could have benefited the seeker. Having survived my share of hazardous crossings, I am pleased to be able to share a thought or two. The main lesson is to keep on learning. Read and seek out other points of view like visiting your blog. Finding what is ultimately important has lead me to appreciate actuality, efficiency and mindfulness. Helping others to see some of the forest through the trees is a rewarding benefit of age and maturity. discernment
Posted by Anonymous at 10:03 PM, January 07, 2006
Africa might be united, but not any time soon. Certainly not.The second largest continent has a very diverse population and several "gonogos" who don't want to let go of political power.Also, the so-called economic integration in ECOWAS (West Africa) is far from the truth, for the common people. Try travelling from Ghana to Nigeria (or vice versa) by road, and see what I mean. You'd be harrased so much... you'd hate yourself for been African.
Posted by Oluniyi David Ajao at 8:24 PM, January 14, 2006
That's where the irony lies. In principle, there is freedom of movement of people in the ECOWAS sub-region but border crossings can be a nightmare I know (except of course one travels by air).There really is no economic integration in West Africa. Individual nation states still guard their borders tightly, with Nigeria being a huge culprit in this regard—shutting out Ghanaian and Beninoise products for different reasons.But economic integration is coming on slowly. The on-going West African gas pipeline project by which Nigeria supplies gas to coastal West African nations is a step in the right direction.
Posted by Chippla at 9:30 PM, January 14, 2006
An imaginative view on the awaited African civilisation.I think when the great circle of civilisation lands in Africa, it will have a new form. This form is based on the fact that Africa is on the centre of the world. Another fact that oil supply is going to finish enventually, so there is no other option for the rest of the world except to use renewable energy sources. so africa here has a strategic position. It has sun heat during the whole year everywhere. The sun heat can mean using solar renewable energy to supply many parts of the world or any part. There are very long rivers in Africa that can also be used for water-created energy supply. The water-created energy supply is already under planning from southern African region up to northern Africa and African countries are planning to extend this energy supply to Europe. The other fact of this imaginative view of the awaited African civilisation is glass created from sand. Glass can be created in many forms and might be used in many aspects and functions if it has gone under real focus as an option for living. One evidence that glass is used in construction of buildings and towers in many parts of the developed world. I think this can give an imaginative idea on how Africa is going to rely on to create a new civilisation.
Posted by Ahmed at 11:42 PM, January 27, 2006
Can Africa be green? A quetion!I said earlier that Africa will rely on renewable energy resources (sun, water, wind etc...) to create a new civilisation. This is due to its location in the heart of the world. Green energy makes earth cool more and more and this will create the environment to new conditions that the world is not experiencing now.I think africans should not accumulate ideas and say we want to make africa green in the fastest possible way. I think we should say: Let's leave this to the maturity of the awaited civilisation.WHY? To make the african civilisation last a s long as a civilisation can last. I hope you understand the idea.
Posted by Ahmed at 11:30 PM, April 17, 2006
I wanted to give you an update on the building of the United States of Africa I started back in 96 with Robert Wood - who together with me comprise The Wood Bros. Music group. We are still at: http://www.geocities.com/thewoodbrosmusic/ - but our NEW music is at: http://www.isound.com/music/wood_brothers_ca/ Our mission remains the same, to unite Africa as one nation and thus unite the world, in uniting Africa.God willing.* take a look at the Current site for the movement at:http://unitedstatesafrica.tripod.com/http://unitedstatesafrica.50megs.com/The United States of Africa - Please forward to anyone who has cried a tear for Africa and wants to see a change."There are no words to describe what I feel about the possibility of the achievement of The United States of Africa. The applause of the entire globe could not give this cause justice, and justice is what this cause will bring. I am sure that the US of Africa will mean the extinction of poverty and the promotion of world Unity. I know the day will come when its constitution is signed. It will be signed not with greed and power in mind, but instead with love and unity. My prayers and deepest salutations are with you all." – JaredWhile we understand the beginning of the USA for USAfrica may have an unusual genesis, the heart felt reasons behind the movement are unmistakable, and the need for a United States of Africa, is Undeniable.No continent in the world is better positioned than Africa, ( a United Africa ) to contribute to the welfare of Mankind over the next thousand years. As an ABC Night Line reporter covering Africa noted, "Africa is 98% virtually the same as it was a thousand years ago." An incredible vast land of undeveloped potential both for it's people and the world.In a United States of Africa, a citizen could freely travel from Gambia to South Africa to Algeria or anywhere on the continent to seek education, opportunity, commerce or the simple pleasure of tourist travel within their vast country.A common African currency much like the EU model affords the ability to buy and sell throughout the continent with a reliable backed currency. A transcontinental citizenship throughout Africa will one day become the envy of the free world.Much of Africa's third world debt could be relived if freedom and security of capitalism were able to thrive in any African country - state from taxes paid by companies involved in business in any African location. An immediate positive effect would arise from local, municipal and federal levels throughout Africa. Any and all of these possibilities can only arise from what can take place in a United States of Africa. With national borders being no more restrictive than state borders, allowing transcontinental travel, commerce and opportunity for all African citizens.A United States of Africa with the largest usable coastline in the world could one day be the country that enriches all of Mankind, feeds the world, heals the world, teaches the world and balances the world. There is so much more involved and the USA for USAfrica is not naive to the many levels that must be addressed, our point is the dialogue must begin at once, in the media, on the airwaves, in discussions and editorials.The concept of a United States of Africa must immediately be brought into public debate worldwide and among Africans themselves.Yours in peace and a United Africa,Mark WoodFounder, USA for USAfricahttp://unitedstatesafrica.50megs.com/http://www.isound.com/mp3s/wood_brothers_ca/http://www.isound.com/music/blue_turban_stone/http://www.isound.com/music/mark_wood_ca/Partner, The Wood Brothers Music http://www.geocities.com/thewoodbrosmusic/Publisher,The Green Valley ReporterICQ 72195575 www.GeoCities.com/GreenValleyReporter Online and Print: Serving the Mountain Communities of the Santa Clarita, Angeles Forest and Antelope Valley Communities.GreenValleyReporter@Journalist.com
Posted by Anonymous at 11:13 AM, May 07, 2006
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asks if there will soon be a “United States of AFrica”?
Chippla’s Weblog, asks if there will soon be a “United States of AFrica”? “Do these names mean anything to you: Thabo Mbeki, Olusegun Obasanjo, John Kufuor, Abdoulaye Wade, Meles Zenawi, Ahmed Ouyahia and Alpha Omar Konare? ...
posted by united states of africa @ 1:35 AM, August 28, 2006

suggested a "United States of Africa"


Alpha Oumar Konaré at UNU
The United States of Africa

Chair of the Commission of the African Union and former president of Mali Alpha Oumar Konaré lectured at UNU on Monday, July 24 on "African Dynamism: Efforts towards Regional Cooperation and Integration." Dr. Konaré's lecture was introduced by UNU Rector Hans van Ginkel and preceded by remarks from H.E. Elly Elikunda Mtango, Tanzania's Ambassador to Japan, and Katsutoshi Kaneda, the Japanese government's Senior Vice-Minister for Foreign Affairs.
Dr. Konaré spoke to a standing room only audience on the need for a recommitted investment in Africa that helps the continent develop beyond the simple exportation of raw materials, and suggested a "United States of Africa" could help ensure the development of the smaller, weaker countries and the continent as a whole.
UNU Video Portal: Konaré at UNU

Kadhafi urges commission on "United States of Africa" to fulfill mission



Kadhafi urges commission on "United States of Africa" to fulfill mission


Libyan President Moammar Kadhafi participated in the meeting of a "seven- member" commission, which is aimed at taking actions toward implementation of Libya's proposals for formation of the United States of Africa, when he participated in the 7th AU summit that closed here Sunday.
The Libyan proposals cover the creation of ministries of foreign affairs, defense, foreign trade, transport and communication at the continental level.
In addition, Libya is proposing the removal of customs barriers between member states of the AU, the unification of transport and communication means and the launching of an African satellite.
The secretary of the Libyan General People's Committee for External Relations and International Cooperation, Abderraman Chalgham, said in Banjul that Kadhafi alerted participants at the meeting that time was of paramount importance to complete the mission of the commission.
Chalgham said the Libyan leader also emphasized the importance of holding the commission meeting before the AU's next summit slated for next January in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in order to define practical points to be implemented.

Gaddafi's 'United States of Africa' rejected
January 22 2003 at 05:50AM
Foreign ministers from across Africa on Tuesday rejected Libya's controversial proposal for a "United States of Africa", saying the vast continent was not ready to merge into one country with a centralised administration.The two-day closed-door ministerial meeting at Sun City in Johannesburg was called to discuss an agenda for an African Union summit, and diplomats said the ministers agreed that the deepening political and economic crisis in Zimbabwe would top the list.A South African foreign ministry spokesperson said there would be no formal briefing at the end of the meeting, which is being chaired by South Africa's Foreign Minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma.
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Instead, Dlamini-Zuma will brief a full AU council of ministers and heads of state and government summit in Ethiopia next month.
The continent could become one big country with one armyThe special summit will be held in Addis Ababa on February 3 and 4. It will be preceded by a ministerial meeting on February 2.During the AU summit in South Africa last year, Libya proposed amendments to the union's Constitutive Act so the continent could become one big country with one army and centralised institutions of government.The proposal, the latest grand-scale scheme put forward by Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, never drew much support among the 53-nation union, and ministers on Tuesday delicately said the idea should be dropped.Diplomats said ministers would recommend a periodic review of Libya's proposals, fearing outright rejection of the plan would hurt Gaddafi, whose oil wealth and aggressive diplomacy have won him a number of friends around the continent.On Monday, African countries pushed through the election of Libya as the new chair of the top United Nations human rights body despite objections from Washington about Libya's flawed human rights record.
'The concern is that a political solution be found to Zimbabwe's crisis'At the coming AU summit, diplomats said South Africa, the group's current chair, wanted to discuss peace moves in Burundi - where Pretoria has asked for AU help to finance a peacekeeping force comprising South Africa, Ethiopia and Mozambique.South Africa also wants the summit to review the implementation of a peace deal for the Democratic Republic of Congo. AU reinforcement of a plan to end the Ivory Coast war was also being sought by the ministers, diplomats said.The ministers also spoke about the food shortages in six southern African countries, but took special note of Zimbabwe."The concern is that a political solution be found to Zimbabwe's crisis. Obviously there are differences over how that can be achieved, which is why they could prefer the heads of state to handle the matter," one official said. - Reuters
This article was originally published on page 4 of Cape Times on January 22, 2003

The United States of Africa! Posted: Thursday,
By: Kirk Moss

It has been mentioned several times before, and became a heated topic that fueled the Pan-African movement during the 1960's. A time when various African countries were shaking their colonial oppressors off their backs, and becoming independent nations. They were consequently starting from ground zero. But today, the United States of Africa is still a burning issue that is been raised within the context of reparations and repatriation. This cohesiveness is the key to the survival of African Peoples as a Race and an entity of the Human Family. Presently, we are the illegitimate children of the Human planet, who were kidnapped from our homelands, and our continental families have been subdued into impoverishment. This paradigm of the United States of Africa must begin with a rigorous overhaul of our motherland in order to form a solid distinctive cultural foundation. First, Economic Power. With this unity of African States comes the economic Power to fight white supremacy and capitalist conglomerates on a global and local level. It would prevent Africa as a continent, and individual African countries from falling prey to various forms of economic stagnation. In particular, embargoes or trade sanctions initiated by the neo-colonial and imperialist powers of Europe and the Western capitalist societies. This opens the door to a new sense of self-reliance, a fundamental principle that Marcus Garvey, the great Jamaican Pan-Africanist, profoundly expressed. More

GHANA
'The United States of Africa -- It May Yet Come.'

By NORIMITSU ONISHIn 1957, the Gold Coast became the first country to gain independence in sub-Saharan Africa, led by Kwame Nkrumah. Nkrumah's vision of African solidarity inspired independence movements across the continent, but his rule ended in a morass of corruption and an army coup in 1966.

Ryan Lash for The New York Times
Ambrose Ackah in Nkroful, the birthplace of Kwame Nkrumah, who led Ghana to independence.

Nkrumah's hometown lies in western Ghana, a small town called Nkroful, where Ambrose Ackah was born some 64 years ago. Mr. Ackah, the son of farmers and one of seven children, was the first one in his family to attend school. He became an elementary school teacher and retired three years ago.

Also born in Nkroful, Paul Yankey, 19, has known only one president, Jerry J. Rawlings, who has brought the country stability and a small measure of prosperity since seizing power in a coup in 1979. Mr. Yankey comes from a family of subsistence farmers, and he has two sisters and a brother. Mr. Yankey struggled financially to graduate from secondary school, and he is not hopeful about the future. He would like to go to a polytechnic college, but his family lacks the money.

He also knows that Africa is filled with university graduates who don't have jobs.
Ambrose Ackah
t was very, very, very good. Many people -- everybody was happy that this time Ghana is independent.
GHANA
1902: Gold Coast's Ashanti state is colonized by the British.
1949: Kwame Nkrumah forms the Convention People's Party to push for independence.
1951: First parliamentary elections are held. Convention People's Party wins two-thirds majority. A year later, Nkrumah is named prime minister.
1957: Gold Coast becomes independent Ghana, the first West African territory to gain independence.
1966: Military coup ousts Nkrumah, two years after he established a one-party state.
1979: Junior military officers, led by Flight Lt. Jerry John Rawlings, stage Ghana's first violent coup.
1992: Rawlings is elected president in national voting. People were enjoying themselves. People from different places, they all came to celebrate.
Everybody, we all liked Nkrumah. So whatever he told them, they did it.
We were all happy that Ghana was going to be an independent country. It was thought there would be development after independence. You see, before independence, the secondary schools were very few in the country. But after independence, the secondary schools were distributed evenly in the country. Even in Nkroful here, there is a secondary school now. The educational system became very good.

I got a job teaching. There were other farmers who joined the workers' brigades. We had workers' brigades, tailors, artisans and all these things. For everybody to get work.
My grandfather promised to send me to a secondary school. But very unfortunately, before I left middle school, he died. There was nobody to help me. I was admitted to secondary school -- I passed the examination. If I had gone, I would be a very big man now.
I was disappointed.

Africans have to stop the fighting and live peacefully.
If people are peaceful, they can develop. But they are power drunk.
That is why there is a lot of fighting all over the continent.

Today's leaders? Tough -- they are trying, it's not so great. Africa is not united. If it's united, it would be the United States of Africa. You don't know. It may yet come.
Paul Yankey

There is no unity in Africa. There is always -- I'll say discrimination in the country. "Because you are not from my father's line or my mother's line, so I do not regard you as a brother or sister." Nkrumah was pleading with Africans to unite for aiding ourselves. It's not possible.

Ryan Lash for The New York Times

Paul Yankey knows his future depends on education.
He was not able to fulfill it because he was overthrown. I don't think it can happen. Even though the presidents in Africa are trying their best, we don't have the one who has tested himself to unite all Africans.

If we unite, we become one body. Lack of employment in Ghana? We can go to another place. United, we can fix prices for our resources. If it's not possible, it means our difficulty in life will continue. And our life will be poor, for ever and ever.

All of us want to leave this country, the young people. We all want to depart this country for America. Britain, America, any foreign country. Japan, German, Italy. But I would come back to help Ghana. If we get something, we must come back home to help our friends.

Everything concerning education, we must provide it ourselves. After I finished secondary, I wanted to go to polytechnic. But because of lack of money, I have to wait. If there is availability of money, I would have continued.
I want to be someone. I know that all will depend on my going to school. It is only with school that I can be somebody in the future. I believe that, because I have been able to see that that is my talent. My main choice is to be an agriculturist.
My parents own a piece of land. O.K., it is for them. But they can't use the land because money for them to engage in farming is too small. Therefore they cannot expand. They can only cultivate for themselves.
My parents could not afford my secondary school fees. So I cut bamboos in the bush. Someone will come to you and inform you that he needs 10 bamboo sticks.
But the money is very, very small. You spent the whole day for 2000 cedis [about 80 cents]. You deduct your chop money that you eat. What's left is very few.

Muammar Gaddafi's call for a United States of Africa at the extraordinary summit of the Organisation of African Unity is the old Pan-Africanist idea all over again – an idea which did not work even during Kwame Nkrumah's time.
At the zenith of the debate in the 1950s, the idea of a United States of Africa was championed by the Casablanca group of states, who proposed a political union in which economic, cultural and military activities would be co-ordinated centrally.
The Monrovia group, meanwhile, envisioned a United Nations of Africa. They did not support centralisation but suggested the engagement of African states in common pursuits.
Colonel Gaddafi should remember that it was the Monrovia group that prevailed. The result was the formation of the OAU. The mandate of the OAU included promoting the solidarity of African states, defending their sovereignty, territorial integrity and independence and harmonising policies, especially in the political and economic arenas.
The OAU has consistently emphasised non-interference in the internal affairs of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the condemnation of political assassinations and subversion, total emancipation of Africa and non-alignment.
The desire for a United States of Africa assumes that the continent is a homogeneous entity with the same characteristics, the same history, and the same future.
That is not true and may never be true. Politics and life in Africa are marked by diversity and negative competition rather than co-operation. African states would rather fight among themselves than forge a united front to fight other continents economically.
The idea of unity in Africa is complex, encompassing several interrelated notions. These include the belief in the uniqueness and spiritual unity of black people, the acknowledgement of the right of black people to self-determination in Africa and finally the assertion of the right of black people to be treated with dignity and equality in all parts of the world.
Even after decades of independence, one cannot state with any conviction that African states have acted in unison to achieve these goals. Africa is disunited and increasingly so. Take for example the notion of the spiritual unity of black people.
Contemporary African relations are marked by endemic conflict – a clear manifestation of mistrust, negative competition, ethnicity and the inability to shake off the colonial legacy.
In the Great Lakes region, a possible First Continental War has preoccupied the majority of African states for over a year. Even though a ceasefire seems to be holding after the Lusaka accord, the conflict is still far from being resolved. In Southern Africa, Angola is in internal turmoil and in North Africa, Algeria continues to be a battleground for fiercely opposed ideologies.
In the tiny Comoros, coups and counter-coups are the order of the day. Civil war has raged in the Sudan for over 15 years, while Somalia has had no central government since 1991. In the same region, Eritrea and Ethiopia have been engaged in an inexplicable war.
The notion of self-determination, for its part, has received wide recognition. But in the Western Sahara, Morocco seems to have sworn that the dream of self-determination will never apply to the Sahrawi people. Similarly, in the Sudan, the people of the south are locked in a deadly war of self-determination.
The desire that Africans be treated with dignity has never been realised. In fact, there is evidence that Africans are treated with less dignity now than at independence. This maltreatment is evident from the harsh immigration laws in the West designed to keep Africans out.
Even before they leave their country, African travellers are confronted with a graphic demonstration of their pariah status: northbound African airlines are routinely sprayed with insecticides before they leave.

United For Africa


Senegalese artist Akon and his father, legendary jazz musician Mor Thiam, will be among the celebrities attending a Berlin press conference on April 5 for the announcement of a joint partnership between sneaker giant Puma and charitable organization United For Africa.


Puma and United For Africa plan to use their alliance to generate donations and raise international awareness for the 30 aid organizations affiliated with United Africa via innovative promotions.During the press conference, Puma will unveil the Puma Charity Collection through a fashion show which will boast new and limited edition items. Proceeds from each collection item will be given to United For Africa. The collection will be available to the public from the end of May 2006 at 10 different locations nationwide, including Puma Concept Stores.Both parties also presented the United For Africa retail entertainment trams which will be equipped with special informative and interactive material. The trams will run on allocated routes around Berlin from the beginning of June to the middle of July, promoting the United For Africa campaign.During this time, numerous events and shows featuring celebrity artists and sportspersons will take place in both the trams and Berlin's Café Moskau, Puma's football headquarters during the World Cup.A CD titled The African Game and a unique "coffee table" book, which is part of the campaign, will be available in the trams, PUMA Concept Stores and Café Moskau and in retail stores nationwide. The entire sales revenue for these products will benefit United For Africa.-article courtesy of SOHH.Com
posted by DestroTheBiggaFigga @ 4/06/2006 07:37:00 AM

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Saturday, August 26, 2006

gradually toward the United States of Africa.



Senegalese President Promotes Pan-Africanism
By James Butty Washington, DC25 August 2006

listen to the interview with Cheikh Tidiane Gadio
The late presidents Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana and Jomo Kenyatta of Kenya promoted the idea of Pan-Africanism in the 1960s. Recently, Senegalese president Abdoulaye Wade has been speaking about the idea within the framework of the African Union. Cheikh Tidiane Gadio is Senegal’s foreign minister; he told VOA English to Africa reporter James Butty why President Wade has been pushing the idea of a United States of Africa.

“What we notice, frankly, is that the people of Africa are ahead of their leaders when it comes to unity. Every African feels comfortable anywhere in Africa…. But some of our leaders still believe that we should strengthen our nation-states…and then go…gradually toward the United States of Africa. But this is not happening. Kwame Nkrumah said everything in 1963…. People did not listen to him. So President Wade, President Obasanjo, President Museveni, of course the Libyan leader, Ghadafi, and many other African leaders – now we have agreed that we should go to a union government first and to the United States of Africa,” he said.
Kenyan-born analyst Professor Ali Mazrui once said that Pan-Africanism requires exceptional leadership.

“Pan-Africanism is not about socialism versus capitalism, versus liberalism. You can be whatever you want to be. The common denominator for all of us…is the fact that we believe that Africa lies in a United States of Africa,” he said.

In regards to Sudan, he says that African nations must be willing to help each other but that international assistance may be necessary.

“It’s easy to say African solution to our African problems. But then we have to put our hands in our pocket, pull out the resources needed. We need 400 million dollars to launch a true peacekeeping mission in Sudan, and then we have to give some additional 8,000 troops. If African countries can do it, then they don’t need anybody else. But unfortunately I don’t think that people are ready to do it, and I don’t think also that the suffering population of Darfur have the time to wait for African leaders and African countries to make up their minds and give the right number of troops and the right money to handle the mission. So that’s why Senegal believes that we start with African forces and then transform those African forces into an international force,” he said.

Let us know what you think of this report and other stories on our website. Send your views to AFRICA@VOANEWS.COM, and include your phone number. Or, call us here in Washington, DC at (202) 205-9942. After you hear the VOA identification, press 30 to leave a message. We want to hear what you have to say! E-mail This Article Print Version
Dear Mr. Wood,

Thank you for sharing your thoughts on the United States of Africa; as you may or may not be aware I believe in the ultimate unification of Africa for ideological and psychological reasons. The fact that foreigners came and partitioned Africa is stain on all people of Africa and of African origin, that shame assumes a preposterous effect when we recall that the western part of the motherland was demarcated purely and solely for the efficacy of the slave trade.

Everyday we wake up whether in Los Angeles,Accra,Lagos Dakar or Detroit it celebrates the white man hold on us as subject peoples on a plain practical level all talk of the African in the 21st century is nothing but hot air if we as a people do not embrace science and technology to propel our industrial revolution which will see us for the first time in 500 years transforming natural objects into man made items and for that we need a Market to protect. So the idea of a Union Government is not far fetched as it seems.

Now your choice of Mr. Anan as its first president fills me with laughter I was taking you seriously until I got to that juncture; please tell me what Mr. Anan has done towards the cause of panAfricanism perhaps I have been living in a different planet. Is this not what is wrong with Africans we talk about the project we've not yet finish how it would look like, but we move with alacrity on who should lead.

Yours in Shock,
John Adewole

Hi Mark,


I was going to give you update this weekend. Thanks for your update. I have been busy with the micro loans project so was unable to get festival operations going. We will start now for it to take place next year 2007 which will be the 50th Anniversary of Ghana independence from British Colonialism.

It would be the best way to outflank all the agents of Neocolonialism in Ghana and Africa.
We decided that we are going to celebrate that Dr. kwame Nkrumah's birthday in Oakland and the event will take place on September 30, 2006 at Cafe Axe Cultural Center in, 1525 Webster Street downtown Oakland.

From 8pm-2am. We will like you to attend and we are thinking of inviting Adewole John from London to attend. It was a short notice decision. Please check http://www.coaforum.comn/ get a report of grants for micro loans. Just sent more money to Senegal for new micro loan startups.
Will call later.
Yaya Fanusie-COA
Dear Mark,

Thank you once again for your thoughts on Pan-Africanism,I note however that you did not reply to some of the specific points I raised. This has led me to conclude that there is a palpable difference in our perception of leadership; someone can be a household name for all the wrong reasons. I am incline to agree with you on a wider premise that whoever we consider may not be as lily white as we would like. As a starting point therefore ought we not to consider concrete achievements on the ground, rather than names bequeathed to us by our oppressors? I think we should ponder on some of these points before we are seduced by the attraction of the project.
Yours in the service of Africa.

John Adewole
JOHNZURIYA@aol.com

AfricaThe United States of Africa plan revivedMuammar Gaddafi is determined to bring the proposed United States ofAfrica project to reality.

At a two-day summit in Libya, African presidents argued that a pan-African body with more institutionalreach than the Organisation of African Unity could give the continentgreater bargaining power with the West.by Patrick MutahiThe setting was right and so were the delegates. One of Africa'sfounding fathers and President of Ghana Dr Kwame Nkrumah, was at thepodium giving a keynote address. This was an Organisation of AfricanUnity (OAU) meeting way back in the early 60s, which would seek tochange the face of the continent. Kwame gave out a 21-point proposalfor the creation of the United States of Africa. The meeting ended andKwame is dead but his dream still lingers on with Libyan leaderMuammar Gaddafi now seeking to accomplish what Kwame started. The ideaof African Renaissance is not new, as South African President ThamboMbeki has been trying against all odds to bring out a better face ofthe continent, which has been dubbed by the West as the "DarkContinent."The OAU has been blamed for inactivity and hence there has been avacuum with many African Presidents seeking to fill the void bycreating regional organisations. That's why the idea of a UnitedStates of Africa is appealing to many nations. However, Africans havefor long been united though informally. The All Africa games, AfricaCup of Nations, Kola Musical Awards to name a few attest to thisunity. African also rallied around the then apartheid South Africa andcampaigned for an end to the system and release of Nelson Mandela.Thus, the creation of the United States of Africa is just to formalisethis co-operation and take it a step further. The road has however hasbeen rough and bumpy.Obstacles and divisions surrounded the proposal of an African Unionwhen Gaddafi mooted it. Despite this, on July 12, 1999, 36 Africanleaders signed a draft treaty set to replace the 37-year-old OAUcharter. The draft provides for a council of African heads of state togovern economic, social, political, and health issues. Mostsignificantly, the text of the final document gives the African Unionthe right to intervene in affairs of member states to restore peaceand security in extreme cases, such as if war crimes or genocide havebeen committed. Many have argued that a pan-African body with moreinstitutional reach than the OAU could give the continent greaterbargaining power with the West.African leaders lauded the draft deal as a significant step, but fewpublicly endorsed Gaddafi's plan of establishing a "United States ofAfrica" by 2001. Gaddafi's proposed "African Union" would include theestablishment of an African presidency, a continental parliament, andthe eventual elimination of boundaries and state sovereignty. Algerianpresident Abdelaziz Bouteflika said "realism" was necessary for Africato develop an EU-style organization, while Kofi Annan emphasized thatit had taken decades to establish the EU, and that Africa shouldconsider setting up an "oil and diamond community" as a first step toeconomic unification. South African president Thabo Mbeki alsocautioned that the foundation for an African Union must be laid "stepby step." Gaddafi however was more optimistic and said it was avictory for Africa. That was then and 2001 has dawned.The two-day OAU summit in Sirte, Libya, at the beginning of thismonth, like the first one did not yield promising results as somecountries have not ratified the treaty. In a declaration releasedafter the summit, the signatories said they "solemnly declare thecreation of an African union by unanimous agreement." However, inorder for the declaration to come into effect two-thirds of OAUmembers, (36 countries) need to ratify the agreement. When thethirty-sixth country ratifies the treaty there will be anotherextraordinary meeting.Gaddafi's plans to revive the proposed union are likely to be watereddown by conflicting regional and state interests. Some nations fearthat the establishment of an African Union would derail regionalcooperation initiatives that are already underway. Nigeria, currentlyhead of the Economic Community of West Africa (ECOWAS), has started aprocess of West African currency unification and trade liberalisation.Ecowas has also made significant progress in easing travelrestrictions in West Africa. Similarly, South Africa enjoys aleadership role in the Southern African Development Community (SADC).Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania have now revived the East African Communityto boost their trade regionally. But still, most African states tradefar more with the rest of the world than they do with each other.Gaddafi has been called a dreamer by many people but he is workinghard to see his dream turn to a reality. All eyes are on him as wewait and see what good comes out of his efforts. Only time will tellwhether the creation of a United States of Africa will be realised andwhat benefit it will bring be to the continent.------------------------------------------------------------------AFRICANEWSNews & Views on Africa from AfricaKoinonia Media Centre, P.O. Box 21255, Nairobi, Kenyaemail: africanews@iol.ithttp://www.peacelink.it/afrinews.html

SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF AFRICA


My Brother:Your presentation has won my soul.

When I was in Law school in 1968, I became aware of what we need to do but one tree does not make a forest so I met Chancellor Williams then 75 year old and I was 29. By 1970, the SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF AFRICA (SADA) AFRICANIZATION SOCIETY was formed and obtained the 501(C)(3) was obtained. All righteousness must be fulfilled. Since then the road has been slow. I am for your proposal as a program to push the ideas you have expressed in USA. USA for USA is a must but how many us will buy into it? I am willing to put in all the EXPERIENCE that I have obtained. You seem to possess a very deep understanding of what we must do. There are statements in your presentations that go beyond entrapments and unwary and CIA or FBI infiltrated negative minds. My wife and I are willing to meet you and take a step in the direction of USA for USA as a program not as an organization for my experience has shown that there are white Americans who are serious about Africa and of course, the African Americans, the Diaspora Africans and the continental Africans are waiting for the right people, the right time to assert their AFRICANITY. With God on our side and a good plan instead of a hurriedly and unprepared efforts, USA for USA is a must and I am ready.

Kofi

This unified Africa will come to be...


I have written for what I call Africa Federation with each African tribe (ethnic group) constituting a state and for there to be a central government. I estimate that there are about four hundred real tribes in Africa, (I have actually enumerated them in one of my writings) not dialects, as some count them to be. Take Nigeria, it is said to have 250 ethnic groups but actually it does not have more than 15 real tribes.... Yoruba, Igbo, Edo, Urobo, Efik, Ijaw, Tivi, Kanuri, Huasa (?), Fulani etc. In this light there are less than 400 African tribes, each of them constituting a state within an African federation with a constitution along the lines of that of the USA, say a president elected for six years (twos term limit), a legislature elected for five years (with six terms limit), a thirteen member Supreme Court (with a term limit of 20 years) and the rest of the government professional and bureaucratic, like anywhere else in the world. This unified Africa will come to be. That is what we at Africa Institute Seattle work for. I am glad that your group also aims at a similar goal for Africa. Let us keep exchanging information.

Thank you.

Ozodi Thomas Osuji,PhD
Ozodi Osuji" ozodiosuji@yahoo.ca

This unified Africa will come to be...


I have written for what I call Africa Federation with each African tribe (ethnic group) constituting a state and for there to be a central government. I estimate that there are about four hundred real tribes in Africa, (I have actually enumerated them in one of my writings) not dialects, as some count them to be. Take Nigeria, it is said to have 250 ethnic groups but actually it does not have more than 15 real tribes.... Yoruba, Igbo, Edo, Urobo, Efik, Ijaw, Tivi, Kanuri, Huasa (?), Fulani etc. In this light there are less than 400 African tribes, each of them constituting a state within an African federation with a constitution along the lines of that of the USA, say a president elected for six years (twos term limit), a legislature elected for five years (with six terms limit), a thirteen member Supreme Court (with a term limit of 20 years) and the rest of the government professional and bureaucratic, like anywhere else in the world. This unified Africa will come to be. That is what we at Africa Institute Seattle work for. I am glad that your group also aims at a similar goal for Africa. Let us keep exchanging information.

Thank you.

Ozodi Thomas Osuji,PhD
Ozodi Osuji" ozodiosuji@yahoo.ca

ChicagoEye says:
This is a fascinating discussion and concept in this eyes of this African-American. Many of us on these shores dream of a united, powerful Africa...one that is the master of her economies, policies, markets and tremendous natural resources. The world would be an exponentially better place with a peaceful, prosperous Africa that is operating at her full potential. Posted 15 months ago. ( permalink )

Friday, August 25, 2006


I believe that a United States of Africa, though an ideal concept, would be extremely hard to put together, even if today's leaders had the wisdom of the illustrious thinkers pictured above. I think the leaders are more concerned with their fiefdoms than with the larger picture and the larger possibilities. Take South America. Simon Bolivar's dream of a united South America remains only a dream in the mind of Hugo Chavez. And South America is much smaller than Africa, and, with the exception of Brasil, Guyana, Surinam and French Guiana, speak the very same language. And they cannot get it together.Some African leaders are dedicated to their people. I may be contradicted, but I think of Robert Mugabe, who is reviled by England and he US. Struggling to put his country right, after the rape of his country by England. Apart from South Africa, how much support is this man getting from other leaders?A United States of Africa would be great. The Europeans are getting their act together, with the euro in place. But I am afraid we won't be seeing a US of Africa anytime soon. As a matter of fact, we won't even be hearing discussions among the leaders about such a concept.Please correct me if I am wrong.

Barrybar says:

PAN-AFRICAN ASSOCIATIONS OF AMERICA FORWARD


Original Message -----
From: To: dbkichwa2@cox.net

Sent: Sunday, August 20, 2006 4:07 PM
Subject: Re: Fw: The ongoing dialogue between Bro. Mark and Bro.Oguchi
SADA says not every body is given the perception to know what makes human beings live a better life. Men who prefer to stick to pre colonial Africa turn to be science students. They really do not see that tribal groups are important to all humanity because tribes represent the original or natives of the land. But we cannot live under the tribal concept because in 1776 the year of the Americans (Anno Americano- AM 1=1776), a new concept of human governance was born.

To SADA, "AD 1" cannot be compered to compered with AM 1, because AD 1 is for calander but AM 1 is for human governance and the Africans I have met during my 68 years of life only prefer AD 1, because most of us are Westernized and take AM 1 for granted. Organized societies really is the key. We can dream of organizing Africa based on tribal basis but that is a bit too late. We are now in the free market era and American democracy is the only system that our masters have permitted us to organized even the present Africa. So to try to think of Africa coming into the tribal governance is a bit too much to imagine. We had OAU which no nation recognized. Now we have AU which the most powerful nation USA is now recognizing by sending an emmissary to the AU. Africa is moving forward with the present system and whether brother Oguchi Nkwocha, MD, Biafra, A Biafran Citizen, is aware of it or not it is irrelevant because most defeated Southern States in US try not to recognize USA. They still try to fly their own defeated flag.

We need Africa Unity, African currency, African Army, Africa Parliament with its Africa Courts, whether good or bad we must live as one people under one flag. However the tribal groupings in Africa must be carefully guided. There can be no Africa without the indegenous prople. Going to Africa means going to a tribe. The land is full of tribes. Each with its own language and natural endowments-culture. If we do not get the Africa Unity to preserve the tribes, most tribes will die of poverty, Western influence and ignorance.

Kofi KAfrica33@aol.com

We are together in this struggle

Swallehe Msuya"

Thanks Mark for your thoughtful ideas about African Unity. We are together in this struggle and without it, Africa will be doomed and marginalised.


Keep Up the Good Work.
Lets Network!
Brotherly,
Swallehe (ex-Tanzania)